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Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)
, but in the congress, period. yet you stay here as a civil rights activist. does this remind you of things you fought growing up? >> oh, lord. growing up in the '60s, i grew up in the '50s as well. i've been around here a long time. when we fought back in the late '50s with trying to get school integration going, then trying to get civil rights -- >> i have to have you hold it there. we're out of time. thank the kids at benedict college in allen. [ male announcer ] you are a business pro. monarch of marketing analysis. with the ability to improve roi through seo all by cob. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle... and go. you can even take a full-size or above, and still pay the mid-size price. i'm going b-i-g. [ male announcer ] good choice business pro. good choice. go national. go like a pro. >>> the massachusetts senate rate is getting very ugly. new video posted online shows supporters of senator scott brown mocking elizabeth warren for claiming a native american heritage. the video shows people performing the tomahawk chop and making war cries.
fighting a civil rights and virginia. we have a state where they want to go backward. the federal government can do a great job intervening in the delivery of recovery support services. meaning the federal dollars -- to me it would make sense to make them spend a small portion on recovery support services, to include housing. housing is a critical element in recovery. i guess my thought process goes -- somehow forced the state to discriminate against recovery, like they do in virginia, to spend some of the federal dollars on the offensive recovery support services. that is the nature of my thought process. by doing so, we can really reduce --, help recovery. to block out recovery people -- it is just insane to me. the state is not going to change. but the federal government if you just make a rule or regulation, you have got to spend a small amount of recovery and stop blowing it to agencies and virginia. i would be glad to elaborate after the press conference, of course. but that is the general thought and presidents. -- precedence. >> we have some programs that are specific arou
moving and revealing than as the secret witness to the struggle for civil rights. the great moral issue tearing the country apart. and after a young man named james meredith creates a crisis by enrolling in the all-white university of mississippi. >> mr. president, please, why don't you, can't you give an order. >> how can i remove him, governor, when there's a riot in the streets. >> i took an oath. >> the problem, is governor, i've got my responsibilities just like you have yours. >> reporter: kennedy sent in the u.s. marshals and the national guard to restore order, and james meredith became the first black graduate of ole miss. then 11 days before he is assassinated -- >> tuesday, november 12th. >> the last words on the last tape are about the hard battle ahead. >> and so our lot becomes more difficult. >> our lot becomes more difficult. and that's it. last word. >> i love that. i think that's really -- i thought that was really moving. and obviously, knowing what happened. he understood how difficult all of this really was. >> wow. >> just fascinating stuff. 260 hours worth of the
win and my retort is if you look back over the years, from women's suffrage, civil rights, to more recently the alternative ener movement, have been borne from third parties garn hing enough votes away from the two major political parties so engrained in the status quo that they never impose the sweeping changes so i hope you can comment on the role of third parties not necessarily in winning elections but in changing the agenda to the point where we get the changes we end up treasuring over the next century. host: thank you for the call. dr. jill stein. guest: thank you for making that point, which is very important. in fact, what so many people call progress in this country, whether you talk about women getting the right to vote, the abbitionist slavery, the protection of workers in the workplace, the right to organize, the 40 hour work week, child labor laws, social social security, the new deal, you name it, all of these have come out of independent third parties, because as you say, the party that is are bought and paid for by large corporations which are part of the status qu
, for example when after the civil rights movement experienced a deep not only resegregation due to taxes but also an elevation of private schools so people can control their private educational spaces. and so this is a really serious crisis. we can't have a shared democracy if we don't share a robust public fear. education is the critical linchpin to maintaining that space. >> cenk: one more thing professor rose if we were all in the same boat, we might be much better off. you think that in l.a. stephen spielberg's kids, tom hanks' kids all the rich movie producers, if they all had to send their kids to public schools, the public schools wouldn't be much better? >> right, not only would they be much better, but we would be able to understand why schools that hoard resources by controlling high tax bases and leaving poor-tax base with fewer resources we would understand why there is such a differential. working people, working parents working teachers who are workers are paying the price that we're balancing the economy on their backs. until there is collective buy-in its difficult to see
presidents do. on civil rights, especially, there was a lot of movement from 1962, when the tapes start to 1963. it was all changing. the white house had swung very much behind the civil rights movement in the fall of 1963. >> he was very involved in the minut minutia, like our other boss, president clinton. >> exactly. incredible moment in august 28th, 1963, the great martin luther king speech "i have a dream" had just happened and they had a political strategy session where president kennedy went through all the members of the house and senate and what he thought their likelihood was to support civil rights. it was clear, he was on their side, driving it forward. >> there's a little clip that exposes a personal side of the president as well. let's play that. >> i wanted to do back to jordan marsh. >> all right, sir. i want that follow's incompetent who had his picture taken in next to mrs. kennedy's bed. he is a silly bastard. i wouldn't have him running a cat house. >> he is furious over a $5,000 bill for a hospital room, right? sn>> a timely expenditure built for a legitimate reason
for the new term -- expected to be, civil rights. >>> plus kobe bryant, dropping a little insight on what it's like to play pick-up with the president. when you take a closer look... ...at the best schools in the world... ...you see they all have something very interesting in common. they have teachers... ...with a deeper knowledge of their subjects. as a result, their students achieve at a higher level. let's develop more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. my brother doesn't look like a heart attack patient. i'm on a bayer aspirin regimen. [ male announcer ] be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen. i'm a fighter and now i don't have that fear. i'm a fighter you're not just looking for a by house. eyes you're looking for a place for your life to happen. want my recipe for healthier hair color? natural instincts! formulated with aloe, vitamin and antioxidants natural instincts has a system that's a healthier way to radiant color. indulge... with natural instincts. less guilt, more gorgeous. bori
know, he gets a lot of grief on civil rights. and it's true he did not use the bully pulpit. he could have done a better job on that. but he was a subtle guy. he desegregated d.c. when people weren't watching. he desegrated the armed wt tr. appointed all the federal judges that desegregated the south. he believed in moving, as john was saying, with a hidden hand. that's true on civil rights as well. he's been unfairly criticized for being weak on civil rights. he was not as strong as he could havebeen, but he did ts poant. w >> let's talk, presidential historian, jon meacham, who has a book coming out after the election that's forthcoming. "thomas jefferson, t.j." ike, a good president? a ar great president? or a great president? think that he -- one of the things we haven't talked about on the domestic side is he ratified what franklin roosevelt and harry truman had done in that he could have created --n 1952, 3,it cle,think, and check me on this, evan, was such that if he had been really intent on rolling back the new deal and the fair deal, it would ve been a huge fight and would h
. >> but i think that the issue is, before my time, e eliberal republicans that stood up for civil rights in the '60s, where are those voices in the republican party it today saying i don't agree with a lot of the things, economic policies but democracy should be nonnegotiable. >> where you know what, this gets to a larger issue. where is the leadership, where is the courage within the republican party. i mean we were talking about this at the time of the birther nonsense, where were the grownups and the republican parties saying to its own members look, you are not only questioning the legitimacy of president obama, but you're questioning the legitimacy of the president of the united states. based on nothing. based on a lie and based on a racist lie and not one person would step forward, any kind of stature within the republican party and say enough. to your point, there's no outrage over this because, you know, quite frankly i think the republican leadership is being held hostage by sort of the last gapses of the far right wing. >> the fear based decision making. >> and shouldn't mitt r
guaranteed act, on par with the civil-rights of the 1960's. host: john from illinois. caller: the only problem that i have is about the tax issue. the reason why i say that is our taxes in this country have never been set up to be fair. what they were set up for was that the rich were supposed to pay the majority of their taxes in federal taxes. working-class and the port were supposed to pay the majority of theirs in homeowners' taxes, city and state taxes -- ordering class and the poor. everything is out of sorts. when you are on fixed income and these states will have to have such a high tax rate because the federal government will have such a lower one. anybody i fixed tax rate goes in and buys a refrigerator that costs $400, will have about a $100 tax on the refrigerator. that is the problem. the ones it will hurt our people that are retired, people that are on disability, things like that. otherwise, i am completely in line with you. i voted for ron paul in 1988. i voted for paul brown. i think he -- i can remember what year it was that he ran as a libertarian. once.ed for ross p
with civil rights of the '60s. >> host: john is from illinois now. john is an independent. hi there. >> caller: hi. mr. johnson, the only problem i have is about the tax issue. and the reason why it's like -- the reason why i say that is, our taxes in this country have never been set at actually to be fair. what they were set up for originally was that the rich were supposed to pay the majority of their taxes in federal taxes, and the working class and the poor were supposed to pay most of -- the majority of theirs in home owners taxes, city and state taxes. and that has been all -- it's got everything out of sorts. my problem with what everybody calls a fair tax is, when you're on a fixed income, and these states are going to have to have such a high tax rate because the federal government is going to have such a lower one, that when anybody that is on a fixed tax rate goes in and buys a refrigerator, they cost $400, the lowest one they can buy, they have about $100 tax on the refrigerator. that is the problem. and the only ones it's going to hurt is people that are retired, people
that blatantly went the wrong way because of a ref's call. our most important civil-rights is voting. it is what everything else relies on. this is not a casual thing. even if it does not turn an election. in a state that is solidly blue or solidly red -- whether or not it changes the outcome. as with the nfl refs, it did get settled very quickly after everybody on national television saw a game go the wrong way, and, tragically, it may take something like that for voter i.d. and voter suppression to get the attention it deserves. >> michael onesteel joined in. -- michael wants to join in. >> i have no idea what the right percentage should be, but it is under 1%. another topic that is way down that we believe should be more of the coverage is money in politics, the fund raising. it is just a sliver of the percentage. one of the things we are trying to do with our project is to bring awareness to these types of issues from a data perspective, so it is not just anecdotal. i think we all know about it, but is it being given enough percentage of coverage is i think a legitimate question. >> or what
the civil rights issue of our day is still the right for people to vote. the tactics to suppress may be less violent now but they are no less insidious. it is just a reminder this thing we call democracy takes work. re! miracle whip is tangy and sweet, not odd. [ man ] it's evil! if you'd try it, you'd know. she speaketh the truth! [ crowd gasps ] [ woman ] reverend? ♪ can i have some? ♪ >>> this is the end of a week of which the political world united. all were opposed to the menace one of our most beloved institutions, the nfl. roger goodell's lockout had gone three weeks into the season. replacements had been working the games to oftentimes an embarrassing effect. coaches, players and fans were furious with the blown calls and clamoring for the return of the real refs when monday night happened. the seattle seahawks last second prayer of a pass into the end zone landed in the hands of the green bay packers defensive back to somehow be ruled the winning touchdown for the seahawks. the uproar began. it was front page news. players and fans alike started contemplating protest and twitter
hispanics. it is a civil rights group the advancement project that came out talking about the potential impact of all of the various efforts in particularly states where there is a big latino population. is that related to this voter i.d. or you know, what other forms, attempts of voter suppression. >> it is related to voter i.d. but we're seeing a lot of other techniques. so in florida, they made it very, very hard to do voter registration drives, the paperwork requirements were very ominous and it was a crime if you didn't comply with them. most organizations including the league of women voters decide they didn't want to play. that law was struck down by a federal court but it did a lot of damage while it was in effect. you're seeing attempts to take away people's ability to vote early so we've got -- took early voting starting in iowa in places like ohio and florida. you're seeing laws passed to reduce the number of states where early voting can happen. that does have an impact, like i said, minority voter
in the civil rights movement. so many people fought s i could express my views and vote and have a say. i never want to take that for granted. not as a celebrity but as an american. >> we just showed the brief clip of youpegth convention. >> i was really nervous. i get paid to be other people for a living. to speak as other people. as the convention i was speaking as myself in a room that big and the stakes are so high in this election. i ft like ias a trendous ho a a big responsibility. i kind of prefer being other people. >> that's an incredible room. energy in there. you get off one line and you feel the energy come back to you and it kind of builds. >> rlly exciting. >> i think we have a clipfou ki le listen. >> today there are people out there trying to take away rights that our mothers, our grandmothers and our great grandmothers fought for. rights that we fought fo ourigote our right to choose. our right to affordable, quality education. equal pay. access to health care. and we, the people, cannot l th en ow about that, mike barnicle. sign her up. >> when you watched yourself, you said y
presidency. imagine what it would mean for civil rights and voting rights and so much more. >> reporter: but if the president is re-elected, what effect would it have on the court? >> well, president obama could have big impact on the court is if one of the more conservative justices, like swing vote anthony kennedy or justice antonin scalia who are both in their mid-70s, if they retired, then president obama could replace a conservative or a right leaning moderate. >> reporter: here's who could make the nominee list if president obama wins a second term. california attorney general harris is getting a lot of buzz. >> the california attorney general has political experience, which is really missing on the court right now. >> reporter: another name circulating is ja kwlen wen. if she's nominated, the california-based federal appeals judge would make history as the court's first asian-american justice. but that's no guarantee. and for example if ruth bader ginsburg is the only justice to retire, the liberal side of the court would not get any bigger. just a little younger. >> and as you k
. and a party that i believe jennifer, wants to dismantle all of the civilized and advances of our time. i'm serious, from women's rights to gay rights to economic social to social security to medicare. in this one case, let us call out republicans, where do you stand, scott brown, for example? where do you stand? >> jennifer: i'm curious to know what you think about this. i think that this race is less about mitt romney -- yes, mitt romney is a terrible candidate. he's got all of his own problems including this sort of privilege bubble he's lived in this and apparently not gotten outside of. put that aside i think the problem is the republican party. and their continual push to the right. off of the edge of the flat earth. i'm wondering if you think that's why the polls are now starting to solidify because they feel like that party is not going to be responding to the needs of every day people. >> i do. it begins with mitt romney. the fish rots from the top. but i do think that people in their gut are feeling that this is a part
involve actual involvement on the ground. i don't know the attitude that either. so right now i think we are kind of, we are kind of in a difficult position where it's horrible to see these things unfold every day on television, but it is a civil war. and you hope you can find a point of fatigue reached on the part of both sides so the and then try to find a kind of peaceful resolution. it's not very peaceful after what you've seen what's been done in the cities with all the loss of life. but i think neither side is close to that point of fatigue, and i do not see anyone really coming to a solution involving the use of military force to break the elections apart, or to oppose a settlement on the situation. so it's going to continue to be ugly for a long period of time. can't tell you how long. it might be two weeks. it might be to use. remember what his father was prepared to do back in the early '80s, killing 80,000 people, and not giving up alawite control of that country. and that's what assad is facing. not just his personal destiny and his family, but his whole people. >> okay, than
into what is already a very deep-seated lack of trust that people have for him. >> right. michael, is mr. romney proud or ashamed of his signature achievement in massachusetts? i would expect most politicians in the civilized world would regard medical care for children as being a major success story. >> yeah. he's actually been pretty consistent in defending what he did in massachusetts, even as he attacks obama care. the issue is less that he's changing his position. it's just that he's slicing this issue very finely. he objects to obama care on a number of very narrow grounds, even though on the stump he sounds like he's objecting to it broadly. he doesn't think the federal government should be doing it, he thinks it's okay if the state government does it, he doesn't think taxes should be raised and he's against the medicare advantage cuts. this is consistent for him since the beginning of the campaign. the problem is his rhetoric sounds like he objects to obama care on a much broader -- >> but, michael, the central issue is the individual mandate. >> that's right. >> and he's having
in the history of the modern church because it has set up a 1i68 court. it's a civil court which is also opened up to the public. >> father gall when the butler was arrested, he told investigators that this could be a healthy thing to bring the church back on the right track. was he in any sense right? >> it seems that the butler was trying in some way to help the pope. in fact, the information that was revealed through the documents that the butler stole is in no way incriminating of the pope himself. in fact, the pope comes off as very kind and gentle throughout all those documents. it doesn't make sense what the butler is claiming. that's one of the things they want, to ascertain the fullness of the truth which is what the pope wants. >> we're expecting a pardon from the pope ultimately. why? >> perhaps. the pope hasn't given any indication he will pardon him. he has indicated his great affection for paulo gab iele. the entire family lives in the vatican and are citizens of the vatican city state. nonetheless, i'm sure the pope wants to first determine that he has fully revealed the truth as
these people, train journalists, train politicians, and train them how to provide services. right now a lot of these areas aren't getting electricity. they aren't getting sanitation. how do you help the civil service help deliver services to the country so everything's not falling apart, and then waiting for that day after that we've been talking about? but as you see, it's continuing to spiral, many deaths, and while they're planning for the day after, people are dying right now. >> when is the day after? when is the day after? all right elise labott, thank you so much for that. we appreciate it. john, back to you. >> all right, 14 minutes after the hour right now. lots of news this morning. let's get the headlines from christine romans. >> with two days to go before the first of three critical debates, president obama is hunkering down in nevada, getting prepped with massachusetts senator john kerry. he's scheduled to fly in to play the part of mitt romney in practice sessions. the president trying to lower expectations at a rally in las vegas yesterday. >> mitt romney, he's a debater. i'
. i analyzed the situation to determine where it needed to be done and did the right thing. i think that that can happen. i think that by working together, that by being civil, you know, you have not seen any attack ads run by me. there have been attack ads run in this campaign, but not endorsed by me. i think that by partisanship is called for and can be accomplished, and i will work to do that. [applause] >> mr. plummer? >> absolutely. what i said i and my opening statements was true. the voters are hurting. they do not care if they are -- if you are republican or democrat. our farmers are struggling through one of the worst seasons they have ever seen. i announced this week that i would call for a discharge petition against leadership because they need a farm bill. there are some very serious policy issues out there now. is this right for southern illinois? there are a lot of issues that are not. obama care is bad. cap and trade is bad. the dream act is bad. i will not stand up for those issues, pushed by republican or democrat. the fact that the farm bill is not happening right
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)